Prop A – The Quality Teacher and Education Act

Overview

Prop A logoProposition A is a $28 million per year parcel tax passed by the voters of San Francisco in June of 2008. The bulk of the funding goes to recruiting and retaining quality teachers in San Francisco, through increases in base pay, bonuses for working in hard to staff schools and in hard to fill subject areas, and retention bonuses.

Have a question about how Proposition A affects you? Review the FAQ posted below, which reflects the latest information on implementation. If you have a question that isn’t answered below, please send an email to UESF. Additional information can be found in the links below.

Frequently Asked Questions

General Pay Increases
Hard to Staff Schools
Hard to Fill Subject Areas
Retention Bonuses
Bonuses For Paraprofessionls, CDP Teachers, and Substitutes
Professional Development
Additional Revenue

Prop A signsGeneral Pay Increases

How can I find out how much money I will make?
Click here to see the certificated salary schedule, which includes 184 day base pay, 180 day base pay (incorporating the four furlough days for the 10-11 and 11-2 school years) and the Prop. A add-on. Your paycheck will show base salary and another line for “Prop A UEASC” or “Prop A UESF Addl Salary Comp”. For a guide to reviewing your paycheck, click here

Is this part of my salary – will it be taxed and will it be a part of my retirement?
Yes. The additional funds added to the pay scale through the parcel tax are part of your salary, are taxable, and will be a part of the base pay for retirement purposes.

Will this money be ongoing? 
The parcel tax additions to the salary scale are expected to remain throughout the life of the parcel tax. In 2008, the voters approved the parcel tax for a period of 20 years, so it will expire July 1, 2028 unless it is reauthorized by the voters. 
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Hard to Staff Schools

Which schools are designated as “Hard to Staff”?
In the 2010-2011 school year, teachers in the following schools will receive additional funding in recognition of the additional work teachers do in these schools.

Elementary

Middle School

High School

Brown Denman Balboa
Bryant Everett Burton
Carver Lick ISA
Chavez Mann Marshall
Cleveland   Mission
Drew   O’Connell
El Dorado    
Flynn    
Harte    
Hillcrest    
Malcolm X    
Muir    
Revere    
Sanchez    
Webster    

How was this list determined?
The list of schools was determined by SFUSD by looking at a number of factors including the projected vacancies for next year; the percentage of students who are English learners, special education students or qualifying for free or reduced price lunch; API score and ranking; STAR status; program improvement status and adequate yearly progress status; the number of teacher separations, and participation in other programs such as the Quality Education Investment Act.

The schools added to the list for the 10-11 school year were Bryant ES, Chavez ES, Flynn ES, and Sanchez ES. The schools that were removed were Carmichael ES, Parks ES, Francisco MS, and MLK MS.

What if I work part time?
Teachers who work part time will receive the stipend adjusted for their fulltime equivalent (FTE). For example, a 0.5 FTE would receive $1,000 ($2,000 x 0.5 = $1,000).

What if I’m a fulltime teacher but I work in a Hard to Staff school only part of the day (or week)?
Fulltime teachers who work in a Hard to Staff school will receive a minimum of half of the stipend ($1,000). If a fulltime teacher works in two or more Hard to Staff schools, he or she will receive the full stipend ($2,000).

How do I show the “extra work” for the additional funding?
You must complete a very simple form to provide documentation of the additional work required in a Hard to Staff school. The form should be made available by the administrator at your site.

When will I get my funds?
Funds for teachers in Hard to Staff schools will be paid at the end of each semester (half at the end of the first semester and second half at the end of the second semester).

Is this part of my salary? Will it be taxed and will it be a part of my retirement?
Additional funds for teaching in a Hard to Staff schools are paid out in stipends. These funds are taxable income and will not be a part of the base salary for retirement purposes. This money does accrue to your supplemental retirement account.

What if I’m on leave? Will I still receive the additional funding?
No. This funding is to compensate teachers at Hard to Staff schools for additional work. Teachers must be working – not on leave – to fulfill this requirement.

Will this money be ongoing?
Hard to Staff schools are determined on a year-to-year basis. In future years, the list of Hard to Staff schools will be determined by SFUSD on March 1 of each year for the next school year.
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Hard to Fill Subject Areas

Which subject areas will receive additional funding this school year?
The district has identified Special Education as the “Hard to Fill” subject area for the 2010-2011 school year. Special education includes those who teach special education classes, psychologists and speech therapists, whor work in Special Education and Teachers on Special Assignment who are working as Content Specialists to provide support for Special Education students.

Weren’t there other Subject Areas that were on the list last year?
Yes. For the 2009-2010 school year, three subject areas in addition to Special Education were deisgnated as “Hard to Fill”: Bilingual, Mathematics, and Science. Teachers working in these areas will continue to get the stipend through the 2011-2012 school years.

Each of these areas are described in detail below:

  • Bilingual teachers – These teachers are identified as those teaching a bilingual, newcomer, or immersion class. Teachers on Special Assignment as Content Specialists providing support in bilingual education are also included in this group. Teachers who teach ESL or English Plus classes are not included in this group.
  • Mathematics teachers – These teachers are identified by the assignment to teach a mathematics class and do not include elementary multiple subject teachers who teach math as a part of a self-contained classroom. Teachers on Special Assignment as Content Specialists providing support in mathematics are also included in this group.
  • Science teachers – These teachers are identified by the assignment to teach a science class and do not include elementary multiple subject teachers who teach science as a part of a self-contained classroom. Teachers on Special Assignment as Content Specialists providing support in science are also included in this group.

How was this list determined?
These subject areas were determined by analyzing the turnover and demand levels for teachers in each subject area. SFUSD consistently has a need for qualified bilingual teachers as well as mathematics, science and special education teachers.

How much will each certificated employee receive?
Certificated members working in Special Education will receive a stipend of $500 for the 10-11 and 11-12 school years (per the 2010-2012 UESF contract settlement). Starting in the 12-13 school year, the stipend will be restored to $1,000. (See below for those working part time in a hard-to-fill subject area.)

Do certificated employees have to be fully certified to earn this additional pay?
No. Certificated employees working in these areas are eligible for this funding; however, certificated employees that are not fully certificated are expected to be working towards full certification. SFUSD does not typically hire teachers who are not fully certificated when fully certificated and otherwise qualified teachers are available.

What if I work part time?
Certificated employees who work part time will receive the stipend adjusted for their fulltime equivalent (FTE). For example, a 0.5 FTE would receive $250 for a year of service in a hard to fill subject area for the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years. ($500 x 0.5=$250)

What if I’m a teacher in a Hard to Fill area part of the day?
Teachers who are assigned to a class and teach in a Hard to Fill area for any part of the day are eligible for the stipend.

When will I get my funds?
Funds for teachers in Hard to Fill subject areas should be paid at the end of each semester (half at the end of the first semester and the second half at the end of the second semester).

Is this part of my salary? Will it be taxed and will it be a part of my retirement?
Additional fund for teaching in Hard to Fill subject areas are paid out in stipends. These funds are taxable income and will not be a part of the base salary for retirement purposes. This money does accrue to your supplemental retirement account.

Will I get these additional funds every year?
Hard to Fill subject areas are designated each year; however, once a subject area is taken off the Hard to Fill list, there is a two-year period before payments to certificated employees who were working in a Hard to Fill area will be stopped. For example, the teachers working in a subject area designated as Hard to Fill for 2009-2010 (Bilingual teachers, Mathematics teachers, and Science teachers) but not for 2010-2011, will receive the stipend during school years 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and 2011-2012.
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Retention Bonuses

What are the retention bonuses and who qualifies for a retention bonus?
The retention bonus is recognition of teachers and other non-administrative certificated staff who maintain their employment in SFUSD for four and eight years – points at which we traditionally lose some certificated staff members. Credentialed teachers on the pay scale for those with a bachelors degree plus 30 hours or bachelors degree plus 60 hours, school psychologists, speech therapists, social workers, nurses, and supervisors of child welfare and attendance are eligible for a bonus after four or eight years or working for SFUSD.

Can you clarify what you mean by after the 4th year or 8th year in SFUSD?
To qualify, you must have just completed your 4th or 8th year in SFUSD.

How much is the bonus?
Per the 2010-2012 UESF contract settlement, after four years in SFUSD, for the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years, eligible employees will receive $1,250 ($2,500 x 0.5) and after eight years eligible employees will receive $1,500 ($3,000 x 0.5 = $1,500).

When will I get my funds?
In the 2010-2011 school year, eligible employees should receive the bonus on the September paycheck of the following school year.

Do I have to return the next year to receive the bonus?
Yes.

What if I work part time?
Eligible employees who work part time will receive the bonus adjusted for their fulltime equivalent (FTE). For example for bonuses paid in the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years, a 0.5 FTE would receive $625 ($1,250 x 0.5 = $625) after her fourth year or $750 ($1,500 x 0.5 = $750) after her eighth year.

What if I was hired in the middle of a school year?
Eligible employees who were hired in the middle of a school year will receive the bonus in the first check of the school year after they have worked four or eight years in the SFUSD. For example, someone who began working at SFUSD in January of 2005 would receive her bonus on the first check of the 2009-2010 school year along with teachers who began working for SFUSD in the fall of 2005.

What if I am not fully credentialed? Am I still eligible for the bonus?
No. Employees must be fully credentialed in their respective areas to be eligible for the retention bonuses.

What if I’ve taught somewhere else? Do those years count?
No. The retention bonus is to recognize and retain teachers who have been employed by SFUSD for four and eight years.
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Bonuses For Paraprofessionls, CDP Teachers, and Substitutes

What Bonuses Should Paras, CDP Teachers, and Substitutes Expect?
In June of 2009, UESF and SFUSD agreed that starting in the 2009-2010 school year, all paraprofessionals will receive an annual $250 bonus and all Child Development Program teachers will receive an annual $500 bonus, payable in the last pay warrent in November.

UESF and SFUSD also agreed that substitute teachers would be eligible for a $200 bonus for teaching at least 60 days per semester, or $400 for teaching at least 50 days per semester in a hard to staff school (see above). If a substituts meest both criteria, the $400 bonus will be paid. Bonuses will be paid in the pay warrent following the end of each semester.
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Professional Development

What Additional Professional Development Does Prop. A Provide?
Prop. A establishes an additional 18 hours of continuing education for all K-12 certificated bargaining unit members, paid at the rate of $40 per hour; an additional 18 hours of continuing education for all CDP teachers, paid at a rate of $30 per hour; and an additional 18 hours of continuing education for all paraprofessionals at a rate of $19 per hour.

Per the 2010-2012 UESF contract settlement, for the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years, the funding for K-12 certificated Prop. A professional development will be used to fund the August 11 and 12 regular professional development days.The 18 hours of Prop. A professional development for CDP teachers has also been suspended for the 2010-2011 school years. In the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years, paraprofessionals have had their Prop. A professional development reduced to 9 hours. In the 2010-2011 school year, 6 of these hours were used on the August 12, 2010 para professional development day. Prop. A professional development will be fully restored for all UESF members in the 2012-2013 school year.

Is the Professional Development offered through Prop. A Mandatory?
No, however participation is strongly encouraged. A member will not be docked pay if he/she misses a meeting, and the trainings do not require a doctor’s excuse for absence. If you miss any of the trainings, however, you will not get paid for those additional hours, and you may not be able to make up the hours. Also, any Unused Prop. A professional development hours expire at the end of each school year.

Do I have any input in to what type of Professional Development is Offered?
The goal of the program is to have continuing education decisions made at the schools/sites and embedded into site programs. Union Building Committees are encouraged to meet with site administration to find a consensus about the timing and content of the trainings.

How does the Proffessional Development Process Work?
For more information about Prop. A Professional Development, review the Resources sidebar on the SFUSD Prop. A web page.Included in this section are guidelines, a flow chart describing the process, and links to Prop. A. PD ‘Passports’ for both teachers and paras.
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Additional Revenue

How is additional Revenue Distributed?
According to the original Memorandum of Understanding signed between UESF and the SFUSD, any additional revenues that the Prop. A parcel tax brings in to the district are to be distributed proportionally to UESF members and the SFUSD, subject to negotiations. The two subsequent MOUs signed with the district, outlined below, can be found in this section of the new UESF contract.

On June 1, 2009 UESF and SFUSD entered in to a new MOU to use the extra funds that among other things increased the amount of Prop. A professional development for paraprofessionals and CDP teachers, and included additional stipends for paraprofessionals ($250), CDP teachers ($500), and Substitutes (up to $800).

In the January 27, 2010 MOU, the extra money was used to create a one-time retirement incentive for UESF K-12 and CDP certificated positions ($4300) and for all paraprofessionals ($1000). The money was also used to increase dependent healthcare contributions by an additional $10 per month for the 2010-2011 school year, and an additional $13.72 per month for the 2011-2012 (bringing the total up to $23.72).
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